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BIPOC Features & Learning

Posted by Mia Toose on

I’ve been reflecting so much on what role I can play in helping to diversify the scuba and water sport industries. Although I’ve made efforts towards BIPOC representation in Truli media, when I look for more and it’s not readily available, I’ve shelved my efforts because I haven’t known what to do about it. These past few months I’ve been intentional in taking the time to learn more about the experiences of Black women in the realm of water sports and it’s been extremely enlightening. There are some incredible role models that I’ve come across that I’d like to showcase. This period of learning and reflecting is so important to ensure the steps I take will have true and meaningful impact on our BIPOC sea sisters.

I'll be featuring BIPOC women, their stories and the issues to help us understand why Black women in water sports are a minority and what ways we can help make the path past the beach, off the dock and into the water easier.

My approach has always been, you can't participate in water sports if you don't have the appropriate equipment (like a Truli Wetsuit that fits your body).  But, in my reflections, I seemed to have skipped the step that comes before that (well until now).  And that is the ability to swim.  There's a reason a black 11 year old is 10 times more likely to drown in a swimming pool than a white 11 year old.

"Simone Manuel wanted to quit swimming because she “didn’t have anyone that looked like’ her in the sport but encouragement from her parents and coaches as well as her love of the swimming kept her going."

The Undefeated article:  A New Chapter for Black Olympic Swimming
Follow this Trailblazing woman @Swimone on Instagram


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